Category Archives: Public Health

Listening Session Comment on EO 13650: Molly Brackin, Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist

By Molly Brackin, Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist Listening Session Public Comment Executive Order #13650:  Improving Chemical Safety and Security My name is Molly Brackin, and I am an AmeriCorps VISTA with the Louisiana Bucket Brigade. I have been with the … Continue reading

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Marcia Oursler, Petrochemical Accident Researcher: Comment on EO 13650

By Marcia Oursler, Petrochemical Accident Researcher Listening Session Public Comment Executive Order #13650:  Improving Chemical Safety and Security My name is Marcia Oursler and I have been with Louisiana Bucket Brigade since August 2013. While many community members are aware … Continue reading

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Public Comment on EO 13650: Improving Chemical Safety & Security

 By Anna Hrybyk, Program Manager Listening Session Public Comment Executive Order #13650:  Improving Chemical Safety and Security Thank you for the opportunity to comment.  My name is Anna Hrybyk and I have been the Program Manager at the Louisiana Bucket … Continue reading

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January iWitness Map Monthly Report

By Molly Brackin, Monitoring & Evaluation Associate January began as a relatively light month for refinery accident reports. The numbers of both citizen and NRC reports were down from previous month, which could either indicate that refineries were doing better … Continue reading

Posted in Chalmette Refining, Emergency Response Team, ExxonMobil, ExxonMobil Baton Rouge, Grassroots Mapping- Gulf Coast, Oil Refineries, Public Health | Leave a comment

Mardi Gras Re-Made in New Orleans

By Erik Paskewich, Social Entrepreneur Growing up in New Orleans means that you think a lot of strange things are normal. It’s normal to eat pounds of mud-dwelling crustaceans. It’s normal to shut down the city for a few days … Continue reading

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Caught in the Act

By Amelia Rhodewalt, Volunteer Coordinator “Did you see or smell it?” It’s Friday, January 31st, and I’m handing out cards with this headline in the Standard Heights community of Baton Rouge. The LABB Emergency Response Team has deployed for the … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Response Team, ExxonMobil, ExxonMobil Baton Rouge, Grassroots Mapping- Gulf Coast, Oil Refineries, Public Health | Leave a comment

Reflections from the field: Emergency Response in Chalmette

By Erik Paskewich, Social Entrepreneur On Monday afternoon we deployed to Chalmette to conduct outreach to increase the usage of the Bucket Brigade’s iWitness Pollution Map. As a new employee of the Bucket Brigade, this was my first chance to go … Continue reading

Posted in Chalmette Refining, Emergency Response Team, ExxonMobil, Grassroots Mapping- Gulf Coast, Oil Refineries, Public Health, RAIN CII | Leave a comment

When It Rains It Oils in St. Bernard Parish

By Andy Zellinger, Research Analyst Updates on Valero Meraux’s October oil spray At 2 PM on Friday, October 25th Valero Refinery in Meraux, LA reported a large discharge of crude oil from a rupture in a crude unit to the … Continue reading

Posted in Accident Response Team, Field Canvass, Oil Refineries, Oil spills, Public Health, Valero, Valero Meraux | 1 Comment

iWitness Map Monthly Report – December 2013

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Why Supporting Emergency Response is Important

By Anna Hrybyk, Program Manager Why should you donate?  Because arming people with tools to document pollution builds our strength to hold polluters accountable. Louisiana refineries average 6 accidents per week. Day in and day out we see industry claim that … Continue reading

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